LGBT Fertility FAQ's - Boston IVF Arizona Center
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LGBTQ Fertility FAQ’s

For more than 30 years, the Boston IVF national fertility network has been at the forefront of providing  treatments to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. We have helped thousands of prideguide-150x150couples build loving families and are honored to have played a role in so many heartwarming moments.

When LGBT individuals and couples begin the process of creating a family they often have very important and specific questions regarding fertility. Below are many of the most popular questions and concerns that are discussed when beginning to think about pursuing fertility treatments.

 

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LGBT FERTILITY INSURANCE FAQ

Many insurance policies cover office visits and tests associated with IUI (intrauterine insemination) and it is becoming increasingly more common that the insemination process itself is covered. If your coverage includes donor egg/IVF procedures, you will need to meet your carrier’s criteria for an infertility diagnosis. Unfortunately, insurance plans do not cover reproductive expenses for gay men, because it is not considered a fertility issue.06

The financial aspect of LGBT fertility is an important one. Don’t hesitate to visit our fertility insurance page for helpful hints or to contact us with any questions or advice. We are here to help!

HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?
Our prices vary by procedure and circumstances. Our fertility specialists will recommend an option that is right for you, along with a treatment plan that is tailored to both yourself and your partner.

LESBIAN FERTILITY FAQ

WHAT IS THE FASTEST AND LEAST EXSPENSIVE WAY TO CONCEIVE?

The fastest way is via intrauterine insemination (IUI) with donor sperm. It requires no anesthesia, and takes just a few minutes.

DO I NEED INFERTILITY TESTING IF I DON’T HAVE AN INFERTILY DIAGNOSIS?05

Even if you do not have concerns about your fertility, we require that all patients undergo complete fertility diagnostic testing to confirm there are no underlying infertility issues. These basic tests ensure that your treatment plan will have the best chance for success.

OUR FRIEND IS A SPERM DONOR. CAN WE USE HIM?

Absolutely, but it’s important to know that Federal regulations require sperm donors to be tested for infectious diseases before collection. The frozen sperm is then quarantined for 6 months, and the donor must repeat the test before the sperm can be released for use. As a recipient, you are responsible for the cost of the tests and freezing at the sperm bank. It may sound complicated, but our team will provide you with the guidance and support to easily navigate this process.

HOW DO WE FIND A SPERM DONOR?

We work with many reputable, national sperm banks. Additionally, you will also have the option to choose your own sperm donor, which often times may be a friend or relative. At your initial consultation, Dr. Hade will provide you with a variety of different options and answer any questions you may have about the donor selection process.

CAN WE MIX OUR EGGS TOGETHER?03

Lesbian couples can achieve pregnancy through a procedure/technology called Partner Assisted Reproduction/Reciprocal IVF. In this scenario, one partner provides the eggs via IVF and the resulting embryo(s) are then implanted into the other partner’s uterus. You will both treated medically to prepare your bodies and each of your cycles will be synchronized.

WHAT FERTILITY TESTS DO YOU PERFORM?

Dr. Hade will perform a detailed review of your medical history and perform a standard array of testing. Depending upon your treatment path, one or both partners will undergo the following tests to assess your fertility:

  • ovarian reserve test to measure levels of follicle stimulating hormones
  • basic hormonal tests
  • ultrasounds to assess your uterus
  • hysterosalpingogram to examine your fallopian tubes

lesbianGAY MEN FERTILITY FAQ

OUR FRIEND IS AN EGG DONOR. HOW DOES THAT PROCESS WORK?

You can use an egg donated by a friend, sister, or other family member, ideally between 25 and 32 years of age. We will perform a thorough family medical history analysis, going back at least two generations, to rule out any genetic diseases. She will then undergo a two-week process of controlled ovarian stimulation to induce the maturation of multiple eggs, which are then extracted via a 15-minute IVF procedure called an egg retrieval.

ARE GESTASTIONAL CARRIERS HARD TO FIND?

We work with many reputable, national agencies that represent women who have generously decided to carry a baby for soon-to-be parents. They have already undergone medical and psychiatric background checks and understand the gestational carrier process. Our team will guide you through communication with agencies and potential candidates, help coordinate screening appointments and monitor the entire process.

WE WANT TO HAVE CHILDREN AND CONTINUE OUR GENETIC LINEAGE. IS THAT POSSIBLE?

It sure is. There are several options to continue your genetic lineage. One option is to use an egg donor and inseminate the eggs during in vitro fertilization (IVF) with your (or your partner’s) sperm. Another option  involves one partner asking his sister to donate her eggs, which would be then be inseminated by your partner’s sperm (or vice versa).

WHAT MEDICAL TESTS WILL WE NEED TO COMPLETE?

A general physical examination and medical history is taken at your initial consultation. This includes asking questions about any hereditary conditions, lingering health problems, injuries, STD’s or past surgeries that could affect your fertility.

You will also provide a semen sample, which is then sent to our laboratory for analysis to measure the amount of sperm present and if there are any abnormalities in the shape (morphology) and movement (motility).

WILL A GESTATIONAL CARRIER’S GENETICS AFFECT OUR CHANCES?

A gestational carrier is not related biologically to the baby she carries to term. The pregnancy is the result of a donor egg – not her own – and a donor sperm. Therefore, if the embryos implanted in the gestational carrier originate from an egg donor and the sperm of one of the intended parents, the gestational carrier has no contribution to the genetic make-up of the baby.

TRANSGENDER FERTILITY FAQ

WHAT ARE MY OPTIONS TO HAVE GENETIC CHILDREN IN THE FUTURE?

Freezing your eggs or sperm before you undergo any type of treatment – surgery or hormonal – that may render you incapable of producing sperm or eggs in the future is a crucial step in your future fertility.

A biological male who is planning to transition to a woman and has banked sperm can use the sperm with IUI or IVF if she is in a relationship with a woman. If she is in a relationship with a man or is single, she can use an egg donor and a gestational carrier.

A biological female who is planning to transition to a man and has frozen eggs can use donor or partner sperm and a gestational carrier if he is single or in a relationship with a man. If he is in a relationship with a woman, they can go through reciprocal IVF/PAR, whereby the partner is inseminated with an embryo created by donor sperm and the frozen eggs.

IF I DON’T FREEZE SPERM OR EGGS BEFORE I BEGIN HORMONES, AM I OUT OF LUCK?

No, you still have options. It all depends on where you are in time with your hormones. If it has been just one month, it should be OK. If it has been over a year, it’s still a potential option, but not ideal. If you stop hormone therapies, there is a possibility that sperm production may resume or that ovaries will ovulate again. However, every case is different, and further analysis is required to determine how long you can be on hormone therapy before it potentially becomes irreversible.